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Bring Back 1962-63

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  1. Sea ice circulation around the Beaufort Gyre: The changing role of wind forcing and the sea ice state Authors: Alek A. Petty, Jennifer K. Hutchings, Jacqueline A. Richter‐Menge and Mark A. Tschudi First Published: 20th April, 2016 Abstract: Sea ice drift estimates from feature tracking of satellite passive microwave data are used to investigate seasonal trends and variability in the ice circulation around the Beaufort Gyre, over the multidecadal period 1980–2013. Our results suggest an amplified response of the Beaufort Gyre ice circulation to wind forcing, especially during the late 2000s. We find increasing anticyclonic ice drift across all seasons, with the strongest trend in autumn, associated with increased ice export out of the southern Beaufort Sea (into the Chukchi Sea). A flux gate analysis highlights consistency across a suite of drift products. Despite these seasonal anticyclonic ice drift trends, a significant anticyclonic wind trend occurs in summer only, driven, in‐part, by anomalously anticyclonic winds in 2007. Across all seasons, the ice drift curl is more anticyclonic than predicted from a linear relationship to the wind curl in the 2000s, compared to the 1980s/1990s. The strength of this anticyclonic ice drift curl amplification is strongest in autumn and appears to have increased since the 1980s (up to 2010). In spring and summer, the ice drift curl amplification occurs mainly between 2007 and 2010. These results suggest nonlinear ice interaction feedbacks (e.g., a weaker, more mobile sea ice pack), enhanced atmospheric drag, and/or an increased role of the ocean. The results also show a weakening of the anticyclonic wind and ice circulation since 2010. Link to full paper: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2015JC010903 Link to pdf version: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/2015JC010903
  2. In a Spin: New Insights into the Beaufort Gyre Publication: EOS - Earth, Space and Science News Authors: Andrey Proshutinsky and Richard Krishfieldon First Published: 8th April, 2019 Abstract: None - this from "Researchgate": A new special collection in JGR: Oceans presents results from studies of the Beaufort Gyre, an oceanic circulation system in the Arctic that has far-reaching influence on the global climate. My recommendation: This article provides an excellent overview for learners of the Beaufort Gyre and how important its influence is it is not only in the Arctic region but also in terms of the northern hemisphere fand global circulation currents and patterns. This superb chart is in the article: I will add further important papers on the Beaufort Gyre over the next few weeks. Link to full paper: https://eos.org/editors-vox/in-a-spin-new-insights-into-the-beaufort-gyre
  3. A comparison of Arctic sea ice in July - 2019 vs 2012 - YouTube Presentation Presented By: Seemorerocks 97 Presentation Date: 23rd July, 2019 Abstract: None My Summary: Seemorerocks is a climate change protagonist and writes regular blogs under this name. This was his analysis of the very low summer 2019 Arctic sea ice extent with a "possibilty" of the 2012 record all time low being beaten. He does a comparison between 2012 and 2019 drawing on data from Zach Labe. He used the following sources: NASA "World View" satellite imagery (source: https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/?v=-6690640.334728033,-3485696,6690640.334728033,3485696&p=arctic&t=2019-04-12-T00%3A00%3A00Z&l=VIIRS_SNPP_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Aqua_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor(hidden),MODIS_Terra_CorrectedReflectance_TrueColor,Reference_Labels(hidden),Reference_Features(hidden),Coastlines ) US Navy NSIRCC site (source: https://www7320.nrlssc.navy.mil/GLBhycomcice1-12/arctic.html.) The 2012 "Great Arctic Cyclone" (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Arctic_Cyclone_of_2012) I have added several other papers and presentations to the portal on the August 2012 cyclone and on the 2012 Arctic profile more generally and more will follow shortly. For the sake of balance, most of the authors conclude that the cyclone was only one of a number of factors at play that produced the record minimum extent in 2012. Link to YouTube presentation (16 minutes): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FjFgDKmdGMhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FjFgDKmdGM
  4. Impacts of the Record Arctic Sea Ice Minimum of 2012 - Presentation 93rd AMS Annual Conference: from 5th to 10th January, 2013 at Austin Convention centre Session 1 on 8th January, 2013: "Global Weather Impacts in 2012" Presenters: Mark C. Serreze Presentation Date (time): 8th January, 2013 (0915) Presentation Summary: On 16 September, 2012, Arctic sea ice extent dropped to the lowest level recorded over the satellite era, which at 3.49 million square km was 18% lower than the previous record low extent set in September 2007. The summer of 2007 featured unusually high sea level pressure centered north of the Beaufort Sea and Greenland, paired with unusually low pressure along northern Eurasia, bringing in warm southerly winds along the shores of the East Siberian and Chukchi seas, favoring strong ice melt in these sectors and pushing the ice away from the coast, leaving open water. The pressure pattern also favored the transport of ice out of the Arctic Ocean and into the North Atlantic through Fram Strait. By sharp contrast, apart from an unusually strong low pressure system in the first week of August centered over the northern Beaufort Sea, weather patterns during the summer of 2012 were unremarkable. While evaluations are ongoing as this abstract is written, it appears that in response to a warming Arctic over the past several decades, the spring ice cover is now so thin that large parts of the sea ice cover are now simply unable to survive the summer melt season. Through the summer of 2012, the Arctic Ocean absorbed a great deal of solar energy in dark open water areas. The release of this stored heat to the atmosphere during the autumn and winter, manifested as strong positive anomalies in surface and lower tropospheric temperatures, serves as an exclamation point on the ongoing process of Arctic amplification – the observed outsized rise in air temperatures over the Arctic compared to the globe as a whole. Whether this outsized warming will influence autumn and winter weather patterns beyond the Arctic region, as has been argued to have been the case in other recent years with low end-of-summer sea ice extent, remains to be seen. What is clear is that the events of 2012 have further raised awareness of the economic and strategic importance of the Arctic through its growing accessibility to marine shipping and extraction of natural resources. Link to full video presentation (15 minutes): https://ams.confex.com/ams/93Annual/flvgateway.cgi/id/24392?recordingid=24392&entry_password=777465&uniqueid=Paper224917 Link to the full conference agenda: https://ams.confex.com/ams/93Annual/webprogram/meeting.html
  5. The great Arctic cyclone of August 2012 Authors: Ian Simmonds and Irina Rudeva First Published: 15th December, 2012 Abstract: On 2 August 2012 a dramatic storm formed over Siberia, moved into the Arctic, and died in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago on 14 August. During its lifetime its central pressure dropped to 966 hPa, leading it to be dubbed ‘The Great Arctic Cyclone of August 2012’. This cyclone occurred during a period when the sea ice extent was on the way to reaching a new satellite‐era low, and its intense behavior was related to baroclinicity and a tropopause polar vortex. The pressure of the storm was the lowest of all Arctic August storms over our record starting in 1979, and the system was also the most extreme when a combination of key cyclone properties was considered. Even though, climatologically, summer is a ‘quiet’ time in the Arctic, when compared withall Arctic storms across the period it came in as the 13th most extreme storm, warranting the attribution of ‘Great’. Link to full paper: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1029/2012GL054259
  6. Extreme Arctic cyclone in August 2016 Authors: Akio Yamagami, Mio Matsueda and Hiroshi L. Tanaka First Published: 12th July, 2017 Abstract: An extremely strong Arctic cyclone (AC) developed in August 2016. The AC exhibited a minimum sea level pressure (SLP) of 967.2 hPa and covered the entire Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean on 16 August. At this time, the AC was comparable to the strong AC observed in August 2012, in terms of horizontal extent, position, and intensity as measured by SLP. Two processes contributed to the explosive development of the AC: growth due to baroclinic instability, similar to extratropical cyclones, during the early phase of the development stage, and later nonlinear development via the merging of upper warm cores. The AC was maintained for more than 1 month through multiple mergings with cyclones both generated in the Arctic and migrating northward from lower latitudes, as a result of the high cyclone activity in summer 2016. Link to full paper: https://rmets.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/asl.757 Alternative pdf version: https://rmets.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/asl.757
  7. On the 2012 record low Arctic sea ice cover: Combined impact of preconditioning and an August storm Authors: Claire L. Parkinson and Josefino C. Comiso First Published: 14th March, 2013 Abstract: A new record low Arctic sea ice extent for the satellite era, 3.4 × 106 km2, was reached on 13 September 2012; and a new record low sea ice area, 3.0 × 106 km2, was reached on the same date. Preconditioning through decades of overall ice reductions made the ice pack more vulnerable to a strong storm that entered the central Arctic in early August 2012. The storm caused the separation of an expanse of 0.4 × 106 km2 of ice that melted in total, while its removal left the main pack more exposed to wind and waves, facilitating the main pack's further decay. Future summer storms could lead to a further acceleration of the decline in the Arctic sea ice cover and should be carefully monitored. Link to full paper: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/grl.50349 Alternative pdf version: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/grl.50349
  8. A mechanism for lagged North Atlantic climate response to solar variability Authors: Adam A. Scaife, Sarah Ineson, Jeff R. Knight, Lesley Gray, Kunihiko Kodera and Doug M. Smith First Published: 3rd January, 2013 Abstract: Variability in solar irradiance has been connected to changes in surface climate in the North Atlantic through both observational and climate modelling studies which suggest a response in the atmospheric circulation that resembles the North Atlantic Oscillation or its hemispheric equivalent the Arctic Oscillation. It has also been noted that this response appears to follow the changes in solar irradiance by a few years, depending on the exact indicator of solar variability. Here we propose and test a mechanism for this lag based on the known impact of atmospheric circulation on the Atlantic Ocean, the extended memory of ocean heat content anomalies, and their subsequent feedback onto the atmosphere. We use results from climate model experiments to develop a simple model for the relationship between solar variability and North Atlantic climate. Link to full paper: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/grl.50099
  9. Solar forcing of winter climate variability in the Northern Hemisphere Authors: Sarah Ineson, Adam A. Scaife, Jeff R. Knight, James C. Manners, Nick J. Dunstone, Lesley J. Gray and Joanna D. Haigh First Published: 9th October, 2011 Abstract: An influence of solar irradiance variations on Earth’s surface climate has been repeatedly suggested, based on correlations between solar variability and meteorological variables. Specifically, weaker westerly winds have been observed in winters with a less active sun, for example at the minimum phase of the 11-year sunspot cycle. With some possible exceptions, it has proved difficult for climate models to consistently reproduce this signal. Spectral Irradiance Monitor satellite measurements indicate that variations in solar ultraviolet irradiance may be larger than previously thought. Here we drive an ocean–atmosphere climate model with ultraviolet irradiance variations based on these observations. We find that the model responds to the solar minimum with patterns in surface pressure and temperature that resemble the negative phase of the North Atlantic or Arctic Oscillation, of similar magnitude to observations. In our model, the anomalies descend through the depth of the extratropical winter atmosphere. If the updated measurements of solar ultraviolet irradiance are correct, low solar activity, as observed during recent years, drives cold winters in northern Europe and the United States, and mild winters over southern Europe and Canada, with little direct change in globally averaged temperature. Given the quasiregularity of the 11-year solar cycle, our findings may help improve decadal climate predictions for highly populated extratropical regions. Link to full paper: The "Nature GeoScience Link" access is still behind a paywall ( https://www.nature.com/articles/ngeo1282 ) but it is now available via this ResearchGate link (and there is also a downloadable personal pdf version link there): https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241606149_Solar_forcing_of_winter_climate_variability_in_the_Northern_Hemisphere
  10. The role of the stratosphere in the European climate response to El Niño Authors: S. Ineson and A. A. Scaife First Published: 7th December, 2008 Abstract: El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the largest natural interannual climate signal in the tropics; oscillations between warm El Niño and cold La Niña phases occur every few years. The effects are felt not only in the centre of action, the tropical Pacific region, but around the globe. Observational studies show a clear response in European climate to ENSO in late winter. However, the underlying mechanisms of the link are not yet understood. Here we use a general circulation model of the atmosphere, that has been extended into the upper atmospheric layers, to provide end-to-end evidence for a global teleconnection pathway from the Pacific region to Europe via the stratosphere. We present evidence for an active stratospheric role in the transition to cold conditions in northern Europe and mild conditions in southern Europe in late winter during El Niño years. In our experiments, this mechanism is restricted to years when stratospheric sudden warmings occur. The response in European surface climate to the El Niño signal is large enough to be useful for seasonal forecasting. Link to full paper: The "Nature GeoScience Link" access is still behind a paywall ( https://www.nature.com/articles/ngeo381 ) but there is now a downloadable personal pdf version via this ResearchGate link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/240493807_The_role_of_the_stratosphere_in_the_European_climate_response_to_El_No
  11. Do you know the username and password to THIS GWO chart site?

    1. Bring Back 1962-63

      Bring Back 1962-63

      Hi, the site you refer to is not GWO - it is the AAM/torque site:

       

      un = gsdm01

      pw = gu3st#1

       

      The GWO site is not password protected.  David

    2. Weathergeek
  12. SURFACE (LAND) TEMPERATURES AND ANOMALIES There are a number of sites which provide some current and archived records of surface land temperatures and anomalies but possibly the most comprehensive one is provided by Karsten Haustein on this site: http://www.karstenhaustein.com/climate.php This contains a wealth of information with many global and regional records, tables, maps and charts including: Current temperatures and year to date - update daily Forecast temperatures for up to a week ahead Hindcast temperatures for past 7 days, past 30 days and month to date Comparisons with previous model runs Archive temperatures, means and anomalies from 2011 to date Links to other sites and much more (see below) I list some of these below with a few example charts, tables and maps to give you an idea of the extensive data available. Global Temperature Anomalies - Year to Date with 7 Day Forecast trend (updated daily on the site) - March 8th, 2019: Global and Regional Forecast and Hindcast Temperature Anomalies - updated daily: This chart has been snipped and pasted - to use the features please use the main link above Here are several examples from March 8th 2019: Comparion of Previous Model Runs Global and Regional Forecast and Hindcast Temperature Anomalies - updated daily: This chart has been snipped and pasted - to use the features please use the main link above Here are several examples from March 8th 2019: Archive of Global and Regional Monthly Mean Temperatures from January 2011 to Date - updated monthly: This chart has been copied across and all the direct links to each feature should work ok. Archive of monthly means (CFSR-GFS, NCEP reanalysis, GISS temperature): Global Robin. Europe USA48 Arctic Antarc. GFS NCEP GISS GFS NCEP GISS GFS NCEP GISS GFS NCEP GISS GFS NCEP GISS GFS NCEP GISS 2011: JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 2011: FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2011: MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 2011: APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR 2011: MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 2011: JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN 2011: JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 2011: AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 2011: SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP 2011: OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 2011: NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 2011: DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC Loop (all Global) Loop (all Robin.) Loop (all Europe) Loop (all USA48) Loop (all Arctic) Loop (all Antarc.) 2012: JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 2012: FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2012: MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 2012: APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR 2012: MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 2012: JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN 2012: JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 2012: AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 2012: SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP 2012: OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 2012: NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 2012: DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC Loop (all Global) Loop (all Robin.) Loop (all Europe) Loop (all USA48) Loop (all Arctic) Loop (all Antarc.) 2013: JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 2013: FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2013: MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 2013: APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR 2013: MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 2013: JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN 2013: JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 2013: AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 2013: SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP 2013: OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 2013: NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 2013: DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC Loop (all Global) Loop (all Robin.) Loop (all Europe) Loop (all USA48) Loop (all Arctic) Loop (all Antarc.) 2014: JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 2014: FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2014: MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 2014: APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR 2014: MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 2014: JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN 2014: JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 2014: AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 2014: SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP 2014: OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 2014: NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 2014: DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC Loop (all Global) Loop (all Robin.) Loop (all Europe) Loop (all USA48) Loop (all Arctic) Loop (all Antarc.) 2015: JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 2015: FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2015: MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 2015: APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR 2015: MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 2015: JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN 2015: JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 2015: AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 2015: SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP 2015: OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 2015: NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 2015: DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC Loop (all Global) Loop (all Robin.) Loop (all Europe) Loop (all USA48) Loop (all Arctic) Loop (all Antarc.) 2016: JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 2016: FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2016: MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 2016: APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR 2016: MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 2016: JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN 2016: JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 2016: AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 2016: SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP 2016: OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 2016: NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 2016: DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC Loop (all Global) Loop (all Robin.) Loop (all Europe) Loop (all USA48) Loop (all Arctic) Loop (all Antarc.) 2017: JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 2017: FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2017: MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 2017: APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR 2017: MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 2017: JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN 2017: JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 2017: AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 2017: SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP 2017: OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 2017: NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 2017: DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC Loop (all Global) Loop (all Robin.) Loop (all Europe) Loop (all USA48) Loop (all Arctic) Loop (all Antarc.) 2018: JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 2018: FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2018: MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 2018: APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR 2018: MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 2018: JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN 2018: JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 2018: AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 2018: SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP 2018: OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 2018: NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 2018: DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC Loop (all Global) Loop (all Robin.) Loop (all Europe) Loop (all USA48) Loop (all Arctic) Loop (all Antarc.) 2019: JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 2019: FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2019: MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 2019: APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR APR 2019: MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 2019: JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN 2019: JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL JUL 2019: AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 2019: SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP SEP 2019: OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 2019: NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV 2019: DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC Loop (all Global) Loop (all Robin.) Loop (all Europe) Loop (all USA48) Loop (all Arctic) Loop (all Antarc.) Here are several examples from particular dates: Much more to follow in due course. I may split some of this topic into several sub categories.
  13. EL NINO SOUTHERN OSCILLATION (ENSO) Current and archived ENSO and related data appears on a number of sites. NOAA, in particular, have a vast amount of archived material. Here's the link to their main page: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/MJO/enso.shtml Their weekly ENSO reports are listed here: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/lanina/enso_evolution-status-fcsts-web.pdf These are updated every Monday and contain a forecast summary. There are current and recent past charts on ENSO region sea surface temperatures (SSTs), sub surface conditions, Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) anomalies, US temperature and precipitation anomalies over 30 and 90 days and forecasts and much more. Here are a few examples from the March 4th, 2019 report (with additional link and further information included): Nino Region SSTs: Sub Surface Temperature Anomalies: The NOAA archives have records of sub surface temperatures with the monthly average anomalies from January 1979 to date in tabular format. Link: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/ocean/index/heat_content_index.txt Equtorial Upper 300m temperature Average anomaly based on 1981-2010 Climatology (deg C) YR MON 130E-80W 160E-80W 180W-100W 1979 1 .56 .49 .39 1979 2 .83 .85 .97 1979 3 .38 .36 .31 1979 4 .01 -.09 -.21 1979 5 .17 .12 .06 1979 6 .24 .25 .35 1979 7 .14 .09 .19 1979 8 .34 .34 .49 1979 9 .71 .79 .91 1979 10 .63 .65 .63 1979 11 .66 .81 1.06 1979 12 .77 .90 .92 1980 1 .58 .80 .83 1980 2 .48 .56 .62 1980 3 .46 .50 .50 1980 4 .51 .64 .82 1980 5 .63 .80 1.14 1980 6 .75 .95 1.17 1980 7 .21 .22 .27 1980 8 .14 .07 .04 1980 9 .05 -.11 -.26 1980 10 .18 .05 .02 1980 11 .41 .37 .35 1980 12 .46 .46 .61 1981 1 .33 .26 .36 1981 2 .26 .21 .30 1981 3 .64 .73 1.02 1981 4 .53 .63 .77 1981 5 .23 .26 .24 1981 6 -.11 -.19 -.22 1981 7 -.38 -.51 -.66 1981 8 -.29 -.50 -.59 1981 9 .18 .05 .14 1981 10 .26 .20 .25 1981 11 .09 -.02 .02 1981 12 .10 -.10 -.22 1982 1 .33 .22 .21 1982 2 .59 .53 .56 1982 3 .74 .78 .92 1982 4 .69 .79 .93 1982 5 .72 .90 .96 1982 6 .76 .89 1.01 1982 7 .79 .95 1.11 1982 8 1.04 1.28 1.61 1982 9 1.15 1.53 1.86 1982 10 1.33 1.83 2.07 1982 11 1.20 1.74 1.92 1982 12 .80 1.26 1.45 1983 1 -.10 .15 .05 1983 2 -.66 -.56 -.81 1983 3 -.94 -.83 -.95 1983 4 -.12 .15 .23 1983 5 -.36 -.12 -.32 1983 6 -.79 -.69 -1.12 1983 7 -1.07 -1.06 -1.51 1983 8 -1.23 -1.29 -1.66 1983 9 -1.54 -1.73 -2.15 1983 10 -1.63 -1.83 -2.25 1983 11 -1.36 -1.54 -1.81 1983 12 -.96 -1.13 -1.36 1984 1 -.70 -.86 -.87 1984 2 -.61 -.82 -.90 1984 3 -.48 -.71 -.92 1984 4 -.42 -.63 -.77 1984 5 -.63 -.90 -1.11 1984 6 -.63 -.90 -1.15 1984 7 -.16 -.24 -.25 1984 8 -.12 -.21 -.22 1984 9 -.19 -.29 -.37 1984 10 -.56 -.75 -.93 1984 11 -.37 -.50 -.63 1984 12 -.21 -.31 -.35 1985 1 .02 -.09 -.16 1985 2 -.23 -.31 -.34 1985 3 -.34 -.50 -.65 1985 4 -.06 -.19 -.24 1985 5 .19 .07 .09 1985 6 .15 .03 -.02 1985 7 .06 -.03 -.08 1985 8 .18 .12 .24 1985 9 .07 -.07 -.20 1985 10 -.05 -.16 -.26 1985 11 .11 .05 .11 1985 12 .24 .16 .27 1986 1 .25 .19 .21 1986 2 .45 .42 .41 1986 3 .37 .34 .46 1986 4 .14 .01 -.02 1986 5 .42 .35 .31 1986 6 .53 .61 .80 1986 7 .44 .49 .45 1986 8 .30 .38 .50 1986 9 .45 .56 .65 1986 10 .60 .81 .95 1986 11 .38 .53 .52 1986 12 .59 .77 .97 1987 1 .54 .93 1.22 1987 2 .15 .37 .17 1987 3 .18 .49 .60 1987 4 .00 .26 .31 1987 5 .13 .42 .58 1987 6 -.09 .17 .37 1987 7 -.42 -.25 -.10 1987 8 -.28 -.05 .20 1987 9 -.47 -.29 -.25 1987 10 -.43 -.23 -.17 1987 11 -.51 -.40 -.37 1987 12 -.52 -.54 -.67 1988 1 -.47 -.46 -.45 1988 2 -.77 -.86 -.88 1988 3 -.94 -1.10 -1.31 1988 4 -1.10 -1.43 -1.76 1988 5 -1.00 -1.29 -1.55 1988 6 -.80 -1.08 -1.22 1988 7 -.52 -.73 -.87 1988 8 -.40 -.61 -.72 1988 9 -.59 -.88 -1.07 1988 10 -1.05 -1.52 -2.01 1988 11 -.99 -1.51 -2.04 1988 12 -.80 -1.31 -1.65 1989 1 -.34 -.72 -.89 1989 2 .17 -.12 -.11 1989 3 .52 .34 .42 1989 4 .55 .45 .50 1989 5 .62 .58 .61 1989 6 .70 .70 .87 1989 7 .63 .65 .78 1989 8 .37 .29 .35 1989 9 .36 .24 .26 1989 10 .11 -.06 -.02 1989 11 .04 -.12 -.22 1989 12 .46 .48 .64 1990 1 .63 .68 .78 1990 2 .86 .98 1.08 1990 3 .68 .88 1.14 1990 4 .37 .56 .65 1990 5 .10 .05 .05 1990 6 -.05 -.20 -.30 1990 7 .22 .16 .27 1990 8 .38 .37 .46 1990 9 .27 .32 .25 1990 10 .35 .40 .50 1990 11 .34 .28 .38 1990 12 .51 .61 .88 1991 1 .51 .64 .92 1991 2 .29 .35 .29 1991 3 .20 .24 .18 1991 4 .36 .47 .80 1991 5 .58 .71 .76 1991 6 .51 .68 .77 1991 7 .53 .64 .73 1991 8 .35 .43 .49 1991 9 .38 .54 .60 1991 10 .77 1.07 1.41 1991 11 .76 1.04 1.22 1991 12 .85 1.23 1.71 1992 1 .83 1.27 1.57 1992 2 .94 1.54 1.98 1992 3 .25 .70 .83 1992 4 -.19 .19 .38 1992 5 -.69 -.40 -.32 1992 6 -1.04 -.83 -.78 1992 7 -.89 -.72 -.73 1992 8 -.78 -.66 -.73 1992 9 -.68 -.54 -.56 1992 10 -.56 -.52 -.50 1992 11 -.42 -.35 -.27 1992 12 -.24 -.05 .19 1993 1 -.18 .07 .27 1993 2 -.05 .17 .28 1993 3 .08 .38 .56 1993 4 .23 .61 .81 1993 5 .00 .32 .42 1993 6 -.47 -.31 -.29 1993 7 -.66 -.50 -.40 1993 8 -.58 -.47 -.38 1993 9 -.29 -.12 .12 1993 10 -.23 -.07 .10 1993 11 -.24 -.15 .02 1993 12 -.36 -.36 -.33 1994 1 -.53 -.57 -.62 1994 2 -.53 -.64 -.60 1994 3 -.45 -.58 -.40 1994 4 -.22 -.35 -.14 1994 5 .04 .00 .16 1994 6 .04 .05 .14 1994 7 .03 .00 .02 1994 8 .28 .40 .67 1994 9 .31 .46 .70 1994 10 .50 .76 1.12 1994 11 .67 .91 1.16 1994 12 .39 .63 .80 1995 1 .09 .36 .51 1995 2 -.17 .04 .13 1995 3 -.47 -.47 -.44 1995 4 -.52 -.56 -.60 1995 5 -.46 -.50 -.44 1995 6 -.27 -.28 -.14 1995 7 -.23 -.34 -.44 1995 8 -.40 -.62 -.84 1995 9 -.53 -.85 -1.20 1995 10 -.46 -.77 -1.03 1995 11 -.44 -.74 -.86 1995 12 -.31 -.63 -.84 1996 1 .04 -.16 -.29 1996 2 .13 -.02 -.12 1996 3 .21 .09 .05 1996 4 .17 -.03 .01 1996 5 .12 -.07 -.16 1996 6 .14 .08 .17 1996 7 .00 -.15 -.18 1996 8 .04 -.18 -.35 1996 9 -.02 -.26 -.46 1996 10 -.07 -.24 -.30 1996 11 -.10 -.37 -.47 1996 12 .08 -.17 -.30 1997 1 .54 .49 .56 1997 2 .84 .85 1.00 1997 3 1.09 1.26 1.17 1997 4 1.49 1.87 2.17 1997 5 1.38 1.82 2.01 1997 6 1.55 2.01 2.25 1997 7 1.34 1.77 1.83 1997 8 1.07 1.50 1.79 1997 9 1.25 1.85 2.38 1997 10 1.35 2.05 2.56 1997 11 1.19 1.94 2.30 1997 12 .56 1.15 1.02 1998 1 -.24 .16 .00 1998 2 -.66 -.35 -.38 1998 3 -.76 -.51 -.61 1998 4 -1.08 -.91 -1.06 1998 5 -1.43 -1.42 -1.75 1998 6 -1.68 -1.79 -2.16 1998 7 -1.74 -1.94 -2.29 1998 8 -1.68 -1.97 -2.46 1998 9 -1.44 -1.76 -2.15 1998 10 -1.55 -1.95 -2.35 1998 11 -1.53 -1.96 -2.33 1998 12 -1.34 -1.71 -2.18 1999 1 -1.16 -1.52 -1.80 1999 2 -.93 -1.36 -1.61 1999 3 -.54 -.86 -.99 1999 4 -.42 -.75 -.91 1999 5 -.29 -.59 -.81 1999 6 -.15 -.40 -.52 1999 7 -.31 -.51 -.64 1999 8 -.56 -.87 -1.21 1999 9 -.52 -.92 -1.27 1999 10 -.50 -.88 -1.07 1999 11 -.72 -1.18 -1.48 1999 12 -.77 -1.23 -1.55 2000 1 -.50 -.96 -1.28 2000 2 -.26 -.69 -.91 2000 3 -.04 -.41 -.64 2000 4 .22 -.08 -.31 2000 5 .34 .04 -.18 2000 6 .34 .15 .08 2000 7 .25 .09 .03 2000 8 .14 .04 .00 2000 9 .08 .00 -.12 2000 10 -.11 -.30 -.37 2000 11 -.30 -.54 -.67 2000 12 -.36 -.72 -.96 2001 1 -.07 -.44 -.56 2001 2 -.04 -.41 -.63 2001 3 .22 -.03 -.29 2001 4 .42 .29 .26 2001 5 .27 .13 .11 2001 6 .33 .29 .46 2001 7 .43 .51 .61 2001 8 .09 .10 .12 2001 9 .22 .24 .35 2001 10 .17 .18 .28 2001 11 .18 .18 .22 2001 12 .22 .23 .17 2002 1 .49 .64 .95 2002 2 .51 .64 .78 2002 3 .45 .60 .55 2002 4 .23 .29 .32 2002 5 .10 .03 .07 2002 6 .43 .42 .67 2002 7 .53 .58 .73 2002 8 .70 .81 1.05 2002 9 .93 1.14 1.41 2002 10 1.04 1.40 1.72 2002 11 .78 1.23 1.58 2002 12 .26 .63 .74 2003 1 -.10 .13 .27 2003 2 -.34 -.27 -.11 2003 3 -.29 -.24 -.06 2003 4 -.44 -.51 -.49 2003 5 -.60 -.77 -.85 2003 6 .08 .03 .13 2003 7 .45 .44 .53 2003 8 .24 .20 .03 2003 9 .28 .16 .10 2003 10 .42 .33 .34 2003 11 .52 .53 .54 2003 12 .30 .25 .17 2004 1 .26 .18 .05 2004 2 .20 .16 .19 2004 3 .01 -.05 -.10 2004 4 .20 .19 .21 2004 5 .17 .16 .30 2004 6 .22 .14 .04 2004 7 .53 .62 .83 2004 8 .56 .61 .78 2004 9 .62 .70 .87 2004 10 .54 .56 .61 2004 11 .53 .58 .78 2004 12 .59 .64 .79 2005 1 .40 .42 .52 2005 2 .29 .42 .59 2005 3 .49 .72 1.27 2005 4 .24 .36 .49 2005 5 .06 .01 .00 2005 6 .10 .04 .11 2005 7 .01 -.08 -.20 2005 8 -.05 -.17 -.42 2005 9 -.02 -.16 -.33 2005 10 .01 -.11 -.14 2005 11 -.21 -.44 -.57 2005 12 -.28 -.57 -.74 2006 1 -.28 -.67 -.97 2006 2 -.19 -.56 -.92 2006 3 .09 -.22 -.29 2006 4 .46 .25 .42 2006 5 .64 .49 .54 2006 6 .76 .71 .76 2006 7 .69 .74 .73 2006 8 .80 .91 1.05 2006 9 .85 1.01 1.13 2006 10 .65 .77 .80 2006 11 .74 1.00 1.35 2006 12 .51 .68 .86 2007 1 -.18 -.20 -.46 2007 2 -.48 -.58 -.77 2007 3 -.47 -.62 -.72 2007 4 -.29 -.51 -.59 2007 5 -.23 -.49 -.58 2007 6 -.04 -.22 -.18 2007 7 -.10 -.32 -.48 2007 8 -.16 -.42 -.68 2007 9 -.35 -.69 -1.03 2007 10 -.52 -.87 -1.19 2007 11 -.54 -.97 -1.19 2007 12 -.49 -.87 -1.08 2008 1 -.50 -1.05 -1.50 2008 2 -.30 -.82 -1.20 2008 3 .21 -.26 -.45 2008 4 .48 .09 .02 2008 5 .60 .33 .17 2008 6 .65 .56 .38 2008 7 .50 .47 .42 2008 8 .17 .03 -.15 2008 9 -.12 -.40 -.69 2008 10 -.11 -.34 -.48 2008 11 -.37 -.65 -.77 2008 12 -.65 -1.08 -1.44 2009 1 -.32 -.77 -1.08 2009 2 .00 -.37 -.50 2009 3 .24 .00 .08 2009 4 .59 .52 .65 2009 5 .79 .77 .87 2009 6 1.01 1.07 1.13 2009 7 .93 1.04 1.05 2009 8 .72 .79 .79 2009 9 .64 .72 .76 2009 10 .70 .86 1.04 2009 11 1.00 1.31 1.75 2009 12 .96 1.28 1.36 2010 1 .66 .94 1.14 2010 2 .60 .93 1.24 2010 3 .41 .65 .97 2010 4 -.06 -.01 -.06 2010 5 -.66 -.83 -1.00 2010 6 -.83 -1.12 -1.34 2010 7 -.80 -1.14 -1.36 2010 8 -.88 -1.33 -1.74 2010 9 -.92 -1.45 -1.93 2010 10 -.89 -1.47 -1.92 2010 11 -.76 -1.31 -1.64 2010 12 -.67 -1.24 -1.56 2011 1 -.35 -.92 -1.27 2011 2 .30 -.11 -.22 2011 3 .72 .50 .50 2011 4 .89 .72 .58 2011 5 .74 .64 .47 2011 6 .52 .46 .39 2011 7 .25 .20 .06 2011 8 -.07 -.22 -.54 2011 9 -.37 -.64 -1.01 2011 10 -.51 -.87 -1.26 2011 11 -.36 -.71 -.92 2011 12 -.40 -.81 -1.07 2012 1 -.28 -.79 -1.17 2012 2 .16 -.26 -.46 2012 3 .40 .06 .00 2012 4 .67 .51 .27 2012 5 .67 .58 .47 2012 6 .71 .66 .56 2012 7 .73 .76 .82 2012 8 .69 .74 .83 2012 9 .40 .44 .36 2012 10 .31 .38 .40 2012 11 .15 .22 .34 2012 12 -.11 -.17 -.27 2013 1 -.24 -.47 -.59 2013 2 -.05 -.23 -.17 2013 3 .13 -.04 .06 2013 4 0.18 -0.02 -0.06 2013 5 0.15 -0.09 -0.14 2013 6 0.31 0.16 0.26 2013 7 0.34 0.28 0.41 2013 8 0.30 0.25 0.32 2013 9 0.40 0.29 0.38 2013 10 0.37 0.26 0.15 2013 11 0.45 0.48 0.62 2013 12 0.33 0.26 0.26 2014 1 0.18 0.00 -0.33 2014 2 0.43 0.42 0.39 2014 3 0.93 1.21 1.60 2014 4 1.00 1.27 1.41 2014 5 0.74 1.00 0.95 2014 6 0.31 0.39 0.27 2014 7 0.05 0.02 -0.18 2014 8 0.36 0.37 0.39 2014 9 0.55 0.58 0.64 2014 10 0.51 0.51 0.53 2014 11 0.62 0.68 0.90 2014 12 0.50 0.48 0.54 2015 1 0.28 0.22 0.15 2015 2 0.54 0.65 0.83 2015 3 0.85 1.17 1.52 2015 4 1.05 1.42 1.74 2015 5 1.03 1.42 1.53 2015 6 0.87 1.27 1.51 2015 7 0.92 1.36 1.69 2015 8 0.99 1.43 1.97 2015 9 1.04 1.48 1.80 2015 10 1.04 1.51 1.91 2015 11 0.92 1.41 1.78 2015 12 0.58 1.04 1.20 2016 1 0.44 0.88 1.25 2016 2 -0.04 0.31 0.56 2016 3 -0.52 -0.33 -0.31 2016 4 -0.92 -0.85 -0.88 2016 5 -1.03 -1.08 -1.15 2016 6 -0.86 -0.97 -1.05 2016 7 -0.63 -0.68 -0.76 2016 8 -0.50 -0.56 -0.71 2016 9 -0.48 -0.55 -0.71 2016 10 -0.59 -0.75 -0.92 2016 11 -0.35 -0.53 -0.62 2016 12 -0.06 -0.18 -0.24 2017 1 0.18 0.07 0.01 2017 2 0.36 0.30 0.15 2017 3 0.43 0.38 0.22 2017 4 0.34 0.28 0.06 2017 5 0.37 0.36 0.30 2017 6 0.21 0.22 0.22 2017 7 0.13 0.15 0.16 2017 8 -0.19 -0.21 -0.40 2017 9 -0.45 -0.57 -0.79 2017 10 -0.54 -0.77 -0.97 2017 11 -0.41 -0.65 -0.84 2017 12 -0.31 -0.54 -0.75 2018 1 0.01 -0.17 -0.16 2018 2 0.29 0.09 -0.11 2018 3 0.46 0.44 0.51 2018 4 0.58 0.62 0.80 2018 5 0.72 0.75 0.88 2018 6 0.77 0.80 0.86 2018 7 0.74 0.73 0.81 2018 8 0.75 0.73 0.81 2018 9 1.03 1.06 1.12 2018 10 1.22 1.39 1.58 2018 11 1.12 1.31 1.35 2018 12 0.88 1.02 1.06 2019 1 0.69 0.77 0.76 2019 2 0.77 0.92 1.10 ENSO Phases - El Nino, La Nina and neutral episodes: The weekly reports also contain more historic data and this table is updated each month: Archived records on ENSO phases go back to 1950 and the full table is available on this link: https://origin.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/ensostuff/ONI_v5.php Here is the full table: Year DJF JFM FMA MAM AMJ MJJ JJA JAS ASO SON OND NDJ 1950 -1.5 -1.3 -1.2 -1.2 -1.1 -0.9 -0.5 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4 -0.6 -0.8 1951 -0.8 -0.5 -0.2 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.0 0.8 1952 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.0 -0.1 0.0 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.1 1953 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 1954 0.8 0.5 0.0 -0.4 -0.5 -0.5 -0.6 -0.8 -0.9 -0.8 -0.7 -0.7 1955 -0.7 -0.6 -0.7 -0.8 -0.8 -0.7 -0.7 -0.7 -1.1 -1.4 -1.7 -1.5 1956 -1.1 -0.8 -0.6 -0.5 -0.5 -0.5 -0.6 -0.6 -0.5 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4 1957 -0.2 0.1 0.4 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.7 1958 1.8 1.7 1.3 0.9 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.6 1959 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.2 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 -0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 Year DJF JFM FMA MAM AMJ MJJ JJA JAS ASO SON OND NDJ 1960 -0.1 -0.1 -0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.1 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.1 -0.1 -0.3 -0.3 -0.2 -0.2 1962 -0.2 -0.2 -0.2 -0.3 -0.3 -0.2 0.0 -0.1 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 -0.4 1963 -0.4 -0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.9 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.3 1964 1.1 0.6 0.1 -0.3 -0.6 -0.6 -0.6 -0.7 -0.8 -0.8 -0.8 -0.8 1965 -0.6 -0.3 -0.1 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.5 1.9 2.0 2.0 1.7 1966 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.7 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.1 -0.1 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 1967 -0.4 -0.5 -0.5 -0.4 -0.2 0.0 0.0 -0.2 -0.3 -0.4 -0.3 -0.4 1968 -0.6 -0.7 -0.6 -0.4 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.7 1.0 1969 1.1 1.1 0.9 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.6 Year DJF JFM FMA MAM AMJ MJJ JJA JAS ASO SON OND NDJ 1970 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.0 -0.3 -0.6 -0.8 -0.8 -0.7 -0.9 -1.1 1971 -1.4 -1.4 -1.1 -0.8 -0.7 -0.7 -0.8 -0.8 -0.8 -0.9 -1.0 -0.9 1972 -0.7 -0.4 0.1 0.4 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.1 1973 1.8 1.2 0.5 -0.1 -0.5 -0.9 -1.1 -1.3 -1.5 -1.7 -1.9 -2.0 1974 -1.8 -1.6 -1.2 -1.0 -0.9 -0.8 -0.5 -0.4 -0.4 -0.6 -0.8 -0.6 1975 -0.5 -0.6 -0.7 -0.7 -0.8 -1.0 -1.1 -1.2 -1.4 -1.4 -1.6 -1.7 1976 -1.6 -1.2 -0.7 -0.5 -0.3 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 0.9 0.8 1977 0.7 0.6 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1978 0.7 0.4 0.1 -0.2 -0.3 -0.3 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4 -0.3 -0.1 0.0 1979 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.6 Year DJF JFM FMA MAM AMJ MJJ JJA JAS ASO SON OND NDJ 1980 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.0 -0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 1981 -0.3 -0.5 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.3 -0.3 -0.2 -0.2 -0.1 -0.2 -0.1 1982 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.8 1.1 1.6 2.0 2.2 2.2 1983 2.2 1.9 1.5 1.3 1.1 0.7 0.3 -0.1 -0.5 -0.8 -1.0 -0.9 1984 -0.6 -0.4 -0.3 -0.4 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.2 -0.6 -0.9 -1.1 1985 -1.0 -0.8 -0.8 -0.8 -0.8 -0.6 -0.5 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.3 -0.4 1986 -0.5 -0.5 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.2 1987 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.5 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.3 1.1 1988 0.8 0.5 0.1 -0.3 -0.9 -1.3 -1.3 -1.1 -1.2 -1.5 -1.8 -1.8 1989 -1.7 -1.4 -1.1 -0.8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.3 -0.3 -0.2 -0.2 -0.2 -0.1 Year DJF JFM FMA MAM AMJ MJJ JJA JAS ASO SON OND NDJ 1990 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.4 1991 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.8 1.2 1.5 1992 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.3 1.1 0.7 0.4 0.1 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 -0.1 1993 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.1 1994 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 1.0 1.1 1995 1.0 0.7 0.5 0.3 0.1 0.0 -0.2 -0.5 -0.8 -1.0 -1.0 -1.0 1996 -0.9 -0.8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.3 -0.3 -0.3 -0.3 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4 -0.5 1997 -0.5 -0.4 -0.1 0.3 0.8 1.2 1.6 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.4 2.4 1998 2.2 1.9 1.4 1.0 0.5 -0.1 -0.8 -1.1 -1.3 -1.4 -1.5 -1.6 1999 -1.5 -1.3 -1.1 -1.0 -1.0 -1.0 -1.1 -1.1 -1.2 -1.3 -1.5 -1.7 Year DJF JFM FMA MAM AMJ MJJ JJA JAS ASO SON OND NDJ 2000 -1.7 -1.4 -1.1 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -0.6 -0.5 -0.5 -0.6 -0.7 -0.7 2001 -0.7 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.3 -0.1 -0.1 -0.1 -0.2 -0.3 -0.3 -0.3 2002 -0.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.1 2003 0.9 0.6 0.4 0.0 -0.3 -0.2 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 2004 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 2005 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.1 -0.1 -0.1 -0.1 -0.3 -0.6 -0.8 2006 -0.8 -0.7 -0.5 -0.3 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.9 0.9 2007 0.7 0.3 0.0 -0.2 -0.3 -0.4 -0.5 -0.8 -1.1 -1.4 -1.5 -1.6 2008 -1.6 -1.4 -1.2 -0.9 -0.8 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.3 -0.4 -0.6 -0.7 2009 -0.8 -0.7 -0.5 -0.2 0.1 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.7 1.0 1.3 1.6 Year DJF JFM FMA MAM AMJ MJJ JJA JAS ASO SON OND NDJ 2010 1.5 1.3 0.9 0.4 -0.1 -0.6 -1.0 -1.4 -1.6 -1.7 -1.7 -1.6 2011 -1.4 -1.1 -0.8 -0.6 -0.5 -0.4 -0.5 -0.7 -0.9 -1.1 -1.1 -1.0 2012 -0.8 -0.6 -0.5 -0.4 -0.2 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.0 -0.2 2013 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.2 -0.3 -0.3 -0.4 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.2 -0.3 2014 -0.4 -0.4 -0.2 0.1 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.7 2015 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.5 2.6 2016 2.5 2.2 1.7 1.0 0.5 0.0 -0.3 -0.6 -0.7 -0.7 -0.7 -0.6 2017 -0.3 -0.1 0.1 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.2 -0.1 -0.4 -0.7 -0.9 -1.0 2018 -0.9 -0.8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.7 0.9 0.8 2019 0.8 Oceanic Nino Index - ONI: NOAA Monthly ENSO Diagnostic Discussions: The monthly ENSO Diagnostic Discussions are produced on the 2nd Thursday of each month on this link: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/enso_advisory/ensodisc.pdf Here's an example with page 1 (of 5, including charts) from February 19th, 2019: Earlier "Monthly ENSO Diagnostic Discussions" are available from January 2001 on this link: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/expert_assessment/ENSO_DD_archive.shtml El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Diagnostic Discussion Archive Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2019 X X 2018 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2017 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2016 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2015 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2014 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2013 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2012 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2011 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2010 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2009 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2008 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2007 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2006 X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2005 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2004 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2003 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2002 X X X X X X X X X X X X 2001 X X X X X X X X X X X X NOAA/ National Weather Service NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction Climate Prediction Center 5830 University Research Court College Park, Maryland 20740 Page Author: Climate Prediction Center Internet Team Page last modified: November 12, 2015 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Model Predictions for ENSO: The weekly reports show the last (monthly) IRI/CPC Model Predictions of ENSO. These charts can be directly located on this link: https://iri.columbia.edu/our-expertise/climate/enso/ This site contains a lot of current and archived data with monthly summaries from March 20th, 2002. I show the first one below: These summaries have steadily evolved - here's one from January 2013: NOAA Monthly Climate Diagnostic Bulletins: The NOAA contain their monthly climate diagnostic bulletins from February 1999 to date for the tropics and extra tropics on this link: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/CDB/CDB_Archive_html/CDB_archive.shtml These contain a vast amount of atmospheric and ocean data with sub links to charts and table. As an example, here's the February 1999 bulletin: February 1999 TROPICS Highlights Table of Atmospheric Indices Table 1 Table of SST Indices Table2 Time Series Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) Tahiti and Darwin SLP Anomalies OLR Anomalies T1 Equatorial SOI T2 200-mb Zonal Wind Anomalies 500-mb Temperature Anomalies 30-mb Zonal Wind Anomalies T3 850-mb Zonal Wind Anomalies T4 Equatorial Pacific SST Anomalies T5 Time-Longitude Sections Mean and Anomalous Sea Level Pressure T6 Mean and Anomalous 850-mb Zonal Wind T7 Mean and Anomalous OLR T8 Mean and Anomalous SST T9 Pentad SLP Anomalies T10 Pentad OLR Anomalies T11 Pentad 250-mb Velocity Potential Anomalies T12 Pentad 850-mb Zonal Wind Anomalies T13 Anomalous and Mean Depth of the 20C Isotherm T14 Anomalous and Total Oceanic Heat Storage T15 Mean & Anomaly Fields Depth of the 20C Isotherm T16 Subsurface Equatorial Pacific Temperatures T17 Tropical Strip SST T18 SLP T19 850-mb Vector Wind T20 200-mb Vector Wind T21 200-mb Streamfunction T22 200-mb Divergence T23 OLR T25 SSM/I Satellite Tropical Precipitation Estimates T26 Cloud Liquid Water T27 Vertically Integrated Water Vapor T28 Mean and Anomalous RH and Divergent Circ (Pac sector) T29 Mean and Anomalous RH and Divergent Circ (Atl sector) T 30 Mean and Anomalous Zonal Wind and Divergent Circ (W Pac sector) T31 Mean and Anomalous Zonal Wind and Divergent Circ (E Pac sector) T32 FORECAST FORUM Discussion Canonical Correlation Analysis Forecasts F1 - F2 Canonical Correlation Analysis SST anomaly prediction F1 Canonical Correlation ENSO Forecast F2 NCEP Coupled Model Forecasts F3 - F4 Forecast SST ANOMALY F3 Forecast SST NINO 3 and NINO 4 F4 Cane and Zebiak Model Forecasts Forecasts of NINO 3 Anomalies F5 Predicted SST Anomalies F6 LDEO3 Model Forecasts Forecasts of NINO 3 Anomalies F5 Predicted SST Anomalies F6 Linear Inverse Modeling Forecasts Predicted SST Anomalies F9 Forecasts of NINO 3 Anomalies F10 Scripps/MPI Hybrid Coupled Model (HMC-3) Forecast F11 EXTRATROPICS Highlights Table of Teleconnection Indices-Part I Table E1 Table of Teleconnection Indices-Part II Table E2 Surface Temperature - Anomalies and Percentiles E1 Monthly Temperature Time Series E2 Surface Precipitation (CAMSOPI)- Anomaly and Percentiles E3 Time Series of U. S. Precipitation Estimates (CAMSOPI) E5 THESE TWO MAPS ARE NOT IN THE BULLETIN United States Surface Temperature - Anomalies and Percentiles United States Surface Precipitation - Total and Percentiles Northern Hemisphere Extratropical Maps Standardized Monthly Amplitudes of Selected Teleconnection Indices E6a Standardized Daily Amplitudes of Selected Teleconnection Indices E6b Mean and Anomalous SLP E7 Mean and Anomalous 500-mb heights E8 Mean and Anomalous 300-mb Wind Vectors E9 500-mb Persistence E10 Time -Longitude Sections of 500-mb Height Anomalies E11 700-mb Storm Track E12 Southern Hemisphere Mean and Anomalous SLP E13 Mean and Anomalous 500-mb heights E14 Mean and Anomalous 300-mb Wind Vectors E15 500-mb Persistence E16 Time -Longitude Sections of 500-mb Height Anomalies E17 NOAA/ National Weather Service NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction Climate Prediction Center 5830 University Research Court College Park, Maryland 20740 Page Author: Climate Prediction Center Internet Team Page last modified: August 24, 2007 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ These bulletins have steadily evolved and the January 2019 bulletin looks like this: Disclaimer Information Quality Credits Glossary Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) About Us Career Opportunities To read the full bulletin - here's the link: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/CDB/ Much more on ENSO to follow.
  14. ANTARCTIC OSCILLATION (AAO) Current daily forecast charts are available on the NOAA website. The previous 3 months are also shown on this link: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/daily_ao_index/aao/aao.shtml Mar 1st 2019 Monthly mean values from 1979 to date appear here: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/daily_ao_index/aao/month_aao_index.shtml AAO index 3 month running mean from Jan 1979 to Jan 2019
  15. PACIFIC NORTH AMERICAN (PNA) Current daily forecast charts are available on the NOAA website. The previous 3 months are also shown on this link: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/pna/pna.shtml Mar 1st 2019 Monthly mean values from 1950 to date appear here: https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/pna/month_pna_index.shtml PNA index 3 month running mean from 1950 to 2018
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