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COVID-19 Pandemic: ~56M Cases, ~1.3M Dead


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And on the other side of the coin, NYCDOH officials reporting zero C19 deaths for 11 July. Preliminary and subject to change, but this is the most significant milestone yet.

God it’s been a crazy 9 months but today was a bittersweet day where it becomes that much more clear how close to the end we are 

A reminder that I saw on Twitter this morning:       “The coronavirus doesn’t care if you’re tired of the coronavirus.”

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One last personal thought from me this evening - I feel in much better hands after watching the Biden administration at work today. It certainly feels like science is back at the forefront along with a sense of urgency, but also plenty of time and effort being put in to construct a coherent, organized response.

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1 hour ago, WxInTheHeights said:

One last personal thought from me this evening - I feel in much better hands after watching the Biden administration at work today. It certainly feels like science is back at the forefront along with a sense of urgency, but also plenty of time and effort being put in to construct a coherent, organized response.

Agreed.. Except it sux that a large swath of the country doesn't see it this way.. :(

 

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4 hours ago, WxInTheHeights said:

One last personal thought from me this evening - I feel in much better hands after watching the Biden administration at work today. It certainly feels like science is back at the forefront along with a sense of urgency, but also plenty of time and effort being put in to construct a coherent, organized response.

Absolutely - I let out the hugest sigh of relief when Trump was finally and truly gone.  We have 4 years to try to reestablish the credibility of science with the anti-science forces of the far right (and a few kooks on the far left too) - it's going to be a tall order.

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I am sure i am late to the game on this, but i don't understand how this ever ends.

  • Vaccine doesn't prevent transmission
  • Vaccine is less effective against some new strains

So, nothing we do is stopping the spread and therefore Covid-19 is here to stay forever.  We'll all need recurring (frequency TBD) vaccines to minimize symptoms like we do with the flu

 

or we hope the vaccine is fairly effective against one of the hyper strains with high transmission rates, and hope enough people get it in a 3-6 month window to get to herd immunity?  Geesh.

 

Just got my first dose an hour ago and have this on my mind

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30 minutes ago, Rygar said:

I am sure i am late to the game on this, but i don't understand how this ever ends.

  • Vaccine doesn't prevent transmission
  • Vaccine is less effective against some new strains

So, nothing we do is stopping the spread and therefore Covid-19 is here to stay forever.  We'll all need recurring (frequency TBD) vaccines to minimize symptoms like we do with the flu

 

or we hope the vaccine is fairly effective against one of the hyper strains with high transmission rates, and hope enough people get it in a 3-6 month window to get to herd immunity?  Geesh.

 

Just got my first dose an hour ago and have this on my mind

that’s impossible 

 

viruses mutate themselves into a less and less virulent state. the Spanish flu was even more virulent and that fizzled out over the course of a couple years. the mutations are already occurring 

 

the longest this could maintain, even if we did absolutely nothing, would be late this coming winter

 

the vaccines are effective though, they prevent serious infection in the vast majority of cases 

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45 minutes ago, Rygar said:

I am sure i am late to the game on this, but i don't understand how this ever ends.

  • Vaccine doesn't prevent transmission
  • Vaccine is less effective against some new strains

So, nothing we do is stopping the spread and therefore Covid-19 is here to stay forever.  We'll all need recurring (frequency TBD) vaccines to minimize symptoms like we do with the flu

 

or we hope the vaccine is fairly effective against one of the hyper strains with high transmission rates, and hope enough people get it in a 3-6 month window to get to herd immunity?  Geesh.

 

Just got my first dose an hour ago and have this on my mind

There's no definite answer on transmission yet, one way or the other.

 

Dr. Fauci addressed the new strains yesterday in the WH briefing and said that all available evidence indicates that the vaccines will do the job against the known strains even if slightly less effective - he discussed a "cushion" that the vaccines have that give it more room to be effective even if the new strains cause a reduction in the overall efficacy.

 

Covid may become endemic but it is possible it takes a route like other coronaviruses do and becomes no worse than a common cold or seasonal flu.

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"The U.K's new more contagious strain of coronavirus may be linked to higher mortality, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said."

Johnson said "in addition to spreading more quickly, it also now appears there is some evidence that the new variant" may be "associated with a higher degree of mortaility"
 

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22 hours ago, WxInTheHeights said:

New dataset dropping. NYS vaccine data has not updated as of publishing time - once it is, this post will be amended. EDIT 16:47: NYS vaccine data updated.

 

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One of the better days across the board in a while, despite continuing elevated positive rates and numbers. Pretty much everyone recording drops in their hospitalized population.

 

Meanwhile, here's a link I'm glad to be able to drop - the Biden administration has released its national plan to combat the pandemic. https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/National-Strategy-for-the-COVID-19-Response-and-Pandemic-Preparedness.pdf

A press briefing from the White House is coming at 4pm.

Would it kill the state to actually update their vaxx data at the same time they do the case/hospital data...

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From Cuomo: praises Biden admin's push for more vaccines in shorter time, notes NYS is about out of its initial allocation and going week-to-week at this point - warns providers to not schedule what they don't have. Says even the Biden goal of 1M/day for the 100M/100 days would leave NYS with 420K/week and that would still take several months to get the 1A/1B group. Big focus is on finishing hospital workers before too many of them get sick and thus contribute to strain on hospitals, which would in turn trigger a shutdown. Important to note the NYS provider network could do 100K/day if they had such a supply. UK strain still a big issue as confirmed cases increase.
 

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2 hours ago, WxInTheHeights said:

There's no definite answer on transmission yet, one way or the other.

 

Dr. Fauci addressed the new strains yesterday in the WH briefing and said that all available evidence indicates that the vaccines will do the job against the known strains even if slightly less effective - he discussed a "cushion" that the vaccines have that give it more room to be effective even if the new strains cause a reduction in the overall efficacy.

 

Covid may become endemic but it is possible it takes a route like other coronaviruses do and becomes no worse than a common cold or seasonal flu.

 

2 hours ago, brooklynwx99 said:

that’s impossible 

 

viruses mutate themselves into a less and less virulent state. the Spanish flu was even more virulent and that fizzled out over the course of a couple years. the mutations are already occurring 

 

the longest this could maintain, even if we did absolutely nothing, would be late this coming winter

 

the vaccines are effective though, they prevent serious infection in the vast majority of cases 

Evidence is mounting that the vaccine doesn't stop transmission, it prevents the virus from making you very ill.   So I am truly having a hard time understanding how it just doesn't keep active at some significant base level in all countries.    I understand there is not definitive answer though.

 

As to Fauci, he said yesterday he was particularly concerned about the South Africa strain and said there were alternate plans for if or when the vaccine isn't effective.  This just means different vaccine's, which sounds an awful lot like how we handle the flu - take an educated guess as to what strain would be most prevalent in a particular year.

 

Add it all up and we are forever in containment and not eradication, endemic like @WxInTheHeightssaid.  Unless a new vaccine is developed of course.

 

@brooklynwx99Last few days there has been talk of 30-90% deadlier strain in the UK.  I agree not definitive, but I don't think we can count on this behaving like the Spanish Flu.  It may or may not.

 

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Good news: confidence in vaccines is on the increase, as per the latest Harris Poll, as 69% of Americans now say they will get a vaccine, up from 58% a few months ago and near the high of 73% in April.  We need that number to be even higher, as "herd immunity" could be as high as 80%, given how transmissible the virus us, but this is a great trend.  

 

https://www.fiercepharma.com/marketing/covid-19-vaccine-confidence-ticks-up-intent-to-get-a-vaccine-near-pandemic-start-harris

 

 

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The CDC altered its dosing recommendations yesterday to say second doses of the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines can be given up to 6 weeks after the first if getting the 2nd doses on the prescribed 3/4 weeks later schedule is infeasible.  Part of this this is a nod to the fact that it's possible some areas might not have enough 2nd shots to meet those original schedules and most experts doubt this will affect vaccine efficacy in any way.  It's still way better to get the 2nd shot a few weeks late than not at all.  

 

https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/info-by-product/clinical-considerations.html

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/timing-second-covid-vaccine-doesn-t-need-be-exact-just-n1255136

https://globalnews.ca/news/7585267/coronavirus-vaccine-second-dose-delay/

Administration

The mRNA COVID-19 vaccine series consist of two doses administered intramuscularly:

 

  • Pfizer-BioNTech (30 µg, 0.3 ml each): 3 weeks (21 days) apart
  • Moderna (100 µg, 0.5 ml): 1 month (28 days) apart

Persons should not be scheduled to receive the second dose earlier than recommended (i.e., 3 weeks [Pfizer-BioNTech] or 1 month [Moderna]). However, second doses administered within a grace period of 4 days earlier than the recommended date for the second dose are still considered valid. Doses inadvertently administered earlier than the grace period should not be repeated.

 

The second dose should be administered as close to the recommended interval as possible. However, if it is not feasible to adhere to the recommended interval, the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines may be scheduled for administration up to 6 weeks (42 days) after the first dose. There are currently limited data on efficacy of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines administered beyond this window. If the second dose is administered beyond these intervals, there is no need to restart the series.

 

 

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On 1/19/2021 at 9:15 PM, ru848789 said:
Interesting data out of Israel with regard to both incredible vaccination rate success (nearly 30% vaccinated so far and cases having dropped over 20% in recent days) and strong indications that the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine will lead to greatly reduced virus transmission rates (in addition to achieving the primary goal of nearly no severe COVID infections).
 
Israel did a fantastic job in both obtaining a large number of vaccine doses, paying a premium for these, and in utilizing their army and health care system to orchestrate an incredibly efficient vaccine rollout. That's easier to do in a country like Israel, where the military is deeply enmeshed in all aspects of life there.
 
With regard to the Pfizer vaccine's effectiveness, Israel and Pfizer have partnered closely to obtain a wealth of early data on a large number of people who have been vaccinated. Perhaps the most encouraging finding is that over 100 health care workers who received the vaccine were shown to have up to 20X the level of neutralizing antibodies (active against the virus), as compared to infected/recovered patients.
 
There is strong speculation that this high level of antibodies will greatly reduce the ability of the virus to replicate in numbers high enough to lead to significant transmission to other people, which would be fantastic. The jury is still out on that, but it's a great sign.
 

 

2 hours ago, Rygar said:

 

Evidence is mounting that the vaccine doesn't stop transmission, it prevents the virus from making you very ill.   So I am truly having a hard time understanding how it just doesn't keep active at some significant base level in all countries.    I understand there is not definitive answer though.

 

As to Fauci, he said yesterday he was particularly concerned about the South Africa strain and said there were alternate plans for if or when the vaccine isn't effective.  This just means different vaccine's, which sounds an awful lot like how we handle the flu - take an educated guess as to what strain would be most prevalent in a particular year.

 

Add it all up and we are forever in containment and not eradication, endemic like @WxInTheHeightssaid.  Unless a new vaccine is developed of course.

 

@brooklynwx99Last few days there has been talk of 30-90% deadlier strain in the UK.  I agree not definitive, but I don't think we can count on this behaving like the Spanish Flu.  It may or may not.

 

 

Actually, I think you have it a bit backwards.  The vaccine trials looked very closely at whether the vaccines prevented becoming infected with symptomatic COVID and the results were that both mRNA vaccines provided about 95% protection from that and just about 100% protection from severe illness.  That's huge in and of itself.  Beyond that, Moderna did look at a sub-population after the first dose and saw a lot less asymptomatic infections vs. placebo, but the sample size wasn't large enough to be definitive, although it's likely that that is the case.  In addition, as per my post above, in the Israeli vaccinations, they're seeing very high immune responses (up to 20X vs. infected/recovered patients), which makes it very likely that any infections that do result will likely not be serious and would be less likely to be infectious. 

 

But for now, we simply don't have definitive data on sterilizing immunity (where vaccinated people simply can't become infected, which is seen for some vaccines, but not others) or even the degree to which vaccinated, but infected people might still be infectious - we'd need data on viral loads of these people, along with well documented contact-transmission cases, which we simply don't have yet.  But it's known that vaccinated people will be infected far less than non-vaccinated people, so that reduced transmissions and it's a damn good guess to assume that vaccinated people who do get infected will, on average be less infectious than non-vaccinated people.  

 

We also have no indications that any of the new variants won't be protected against by the mRNA vaccines (and some work has been done to show that these variants should be protected against by the vaccines).  Eventually, variants could evolve which partially or completely escape vaccine protection, but the good news there is that when that happens, at least for the mRNA vaccines, producing a modified vaccine effective for that variant should only take 6-8 weeks - it wouldn't be guesswork.  But yes, many are speculating that the virus eventually becomes endemic, but more like the common cold, as per the article below.  

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/12/health/coronavirus-immunity-future.html

 

 

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1 hour ago, ru848789 said:

 

 

Actually, I think you have it a bit backwards.  The vaccine trials looked very closely at whether the vaccines prevented becoming infected with symptomatic COVID and the results were that both mRNA vaccines provided about 95% protection from that and just about 100% protection from severe illness.  That's huge in and of itself.  Beyond that, Moderna did look at a sub-population after the first dose and saw a lot less asymptomatic infections vs. placebo, but the sample size wasn't large enough to be definitive, although it's likely that that is the case.  In addition, as per my post above, in the Israeli vaccinations, they're seeing very high immune responses (up to 20X vs. infected/recovered patients), which makes it very likely that any infections that do result will likely not be serious and would be less likely to be infectious. 

 

But for now, we simply don't have definitive data on sterilizing immunity (where vaccinated people simply can't become infected, which is seen for some vaccines, but not others) or even the degree to which vaccinated, but infected people might still be infectious - we'd need data on viral loads of these people, along with well documented contact-transmission cases, which we simply don't have yet.  But it's known that vaccinated people will be infected far less than non-vaccinated people, so that reduced transmissions and it's a damn good guess to assume that vaccinated people who do get infected will, on average be less infectious than non-vaccinated people.  

 

We also have no indications that any of the new variants won't be protected against by the mRNA vaccines (and some work has been done to show that these variants should be protected against by the vaccines).  Eventually, variants could evolve which partially or completely escape vaccine protection, but the good news there is that when that happens, at least for the mRNA vaccines, producing a modified vaccine effective for that variant should only take 6-8 weeks - it wouldn't be guesswork.  But yes, many are speculating that the virus eventually becomes endemic, but more like the common cold, as per the article below.  

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/12/health/coronavirus-immunity-future.html

 

 

Thank you!

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On 1/9/2021 at 2:33 AM, ru848789 said:

 

Update on SARS-CoV-2 variants and vaccines.  Preliminary work shows that the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine will very likely still be effective against both the UK and South Africa variants that are circulating and appear to be more transmissible (more work remains to be 100% sure on this).  And even if we eventually see variants that "escape" the vaccine, modifying the RNA sequence used in the mRNA vaccines to provide effectiveness for new strains, should only take 6-12 weeks (it would take longer in other vaccines that use viral vectors to deliver the RNA; same for protein-based vaccines).  It's still likely that vaccine immunity will last a few to several years, barring many more major mutations than we've seen to date (which should take years given the fairly slow evolution rate of this virus).  

 

https://apnews.com/article/pfizer-study-vaccine-coronavirus-strain-3094dd3cc91b4a20780402476cdcb5ae

 

In addition, work was done with the UK and South African variants and polyclonal antibodies from convalescent patients (infected with COVID and recovered) and this work showed the antibodies generally neutralized the UK variant, but had some reduced neutralization of the SA variant, which has an additional mutation (E484K, an amino acid on the spike protein of the virus) the UK variant does not have.  However, immune responses from the vaccine are more robust and broader, so the authors of this study said that they didn't think this variant would have a serious effect on vaccine efficacy - and that further mutations over time would likely be needed to erode vaccine immunity. 

 

“I’m quite optimistic that even with these mutations, immunity is not going to suddenly fail on us,” Bloom said. “It might be gradually eroded, but it’s not going to fail on us, at least in the short term.”

 

https://www.statnews.com/2021/01/07/coronavirus-mutation-vaccine-strength/

 

Having said all of the above, this is why getting the world vaccinated fairly quickly, especially those countries with high infection rates is so important, since evolutionary changes are far more likely when more people are being infected (just rolling the dice more).  What would also suck is if the virus were largely eliminated from a bunch of countries, but then a new variant that somewhat or even largely escapes the vaccines (since they're all targeting the spike protein, although not 100% identically, so eluding all of them is unlikely) developed elsewhere and started infecting vaccinated people.  That's why vigilance on strains and immune responses to those strains induced by vaccines are so important to identify quickly to allow modified vaccines to be developed quickly. 

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/health-coronavirus-variant/drugmakers-expect-tests-to-confirm-vaccines-effective-against-new-coronavirus-variant-idUSKBN28W1P5

 

More on vaccines and their likely ability to still be able to protect against the new variants from the UK, South Africa and Brazil in the article below from Nat Geo.  The article is really well done with interviews featuring a number of leading scientists in the vaccine field.  One key issue is that the faster we can vaccinate people, the faster we can reduce viral transmissions and the faster we can reduce mutations producing more variants.  In addition the article talks about how it should be relatively easy to produce new vaccines if variants eventually "escape" existing vaccines. 

 

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2021/01/existing-vaccines-should-work-against-new-coronavirus-variants-for-now/

 

“The variants do have changes in the [virus’s] spike protein, but not enough to make the vaccine not protective,” said Arnold Monto, the acting chair of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccine and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee, in a January 11 interview with the medical journal JAMA. “It looks like [existing vaccines] should work, and we’ll know more definitively in the next couple of weeks.”

 

“We have not seen any evidence yet that the new variants are not going to be covered by the vaccine, and, in fact, the way you stop new variants is to contain the virus,” says Philip Dormitzer, chief scientific officer of viral vaccines at Pfizer’s vaccine research division. “The less replication of the virus there is in the world, the fewer variants that are going to get generated.”

 

One of the benefits of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines is that they can be updated quickly. But Dormitzer cautions that laboratory research and manufacturing are just two steps in a vaccine’s long, involved journey to someone’s arm. If a vaccine gets updated, government regulators would need to check whether it’s still safe and effective. Researchers say that policies governing the seasonal flu vaccine’s regular updates could provide a good framework.

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21 hours ago, ru848789 said:
Nice to see scientists back in charge of science...
 

 

𝗙𝗮𝘂𝗰𝗶, 𝘂𝗻𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗲𝗱 (𝗪𝗮𝗣𝗼 𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗹𝗲) 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗙𝗮𝘂𝗰𝗶 𝗼𝗻 𝗧𝗥𝗠𝗦 (𝗰𝗹𝗶𝗽)
 
We all knew that Fauci had been sidelined and muzzled to some extent by the Trump Administration, but his latest comments confirm everything we suspected. Also sad to see Dr. Birx talking about how she thought about quitting every day, but sodiered on as she thought she still could help. Sad, but so nice to see science flourishing again in the Biden Administration - including Fauci correcting the Biden Administration on the fact that the previous Administration had a vaccine rollout going on, even if it was going poorly.  Speaking up is encouraged.  
 
"𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑖𝑑𝑒𝑎 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑔𝑒𝑡 𝑢𝑝 ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑡𝑎𝑙𝑘 𝑎𝑏𝑜𝑢𝑡 𝑤ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑘𝑛𝑜𝑤, 𝑤ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑒𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒 — 𝑤ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑠𝑐𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒 𝑖𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑘𝑛𝑜𝑤 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡’𝑠 𝑖𝑡, 𝑙𝑒𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑠𝑐𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒 𝑠𝑝𝑒𝑎𝑘, 𝑖𝑡 𝑖𝑠 𝑠𝑜𝑚𝑒𝑤ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑎 𝑙𝑖𝑏𝑒𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑓𝑒𝑒𝑙𝑖𝑛𝑔.”
“𝐵𝑢𝑡 𝑖𝑡 𝑖𝑠 𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑦 𝑐𝑙𝑒𝑎𝑟 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑤𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑤𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑠𝑎𝑖𝑑, 𝑏𝑒 𝑖𝑡 𝑟𝑒𝑔𝑎𝑟𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠 𝑙𝑖𝑘𝑒 ℎ𝑦𝑑𝑟𝑜𝑥𝑦𝑐ℎ𝑙𝑜𝑟𝑜𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑛𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑜𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠 𝑙𝑖𝑘𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡, 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑟𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑦 𝑤𝑎𝑠 𝑢𝑛𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑓𝑜𝑟𝑡𝑎𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑏𝑒𝑐𝑎𝑢𝑠𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑦 𝑤𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑛𝑜𝑡 𝑏𝑎𝑠𝑒𝑑 𝑜𝑛 𝑠𝑐𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑓𝑖𝑐 𝑓𝑎𝑐𝑡.”
“𝑌𝑜𝑢 𝑤𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑏𝑎𝑠𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑦 𝑣𝑎𝑛𝑖𝑠ℎ𝑒𝑑 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑎 𝑓𝑒𝑤 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑡ℎ𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑎 𝑤ℎ𝑖𝑙𝑒,” 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑟𝑒𝑝𝑜𝑟𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑟𝑒𝑝𝑙𝑖𝑒𝑑. “𝑌𝑜𝑢 𝑓𝑒𝑒𝑙 𝑙𝑖𝑘𝑒 𝑦𝑜𝑢’𝑟𝑒 𝑏𝑎𝑐𝑘 𝑛𝑜𝑤?”
“𝐼 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑘 𝑠𝑜,” 𝐹𝑎𝑢𝑐𝑖 𝑠𝑎𝑖𝑑 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑎 𝑙𝑎𝑢𝑔ℎ.
 
𝐹𝑎𝑢𝑐𝑖 𝑡𝑜 𝑀𝑎𝑑𝑑𝑜𝑤
"𝐼'𝑣𝑒 𝑏𝑒𝑒𝑛 𝑤𝑎𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑡𝑜 𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑜𝑛 𝑦𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑠ℎ𝑜𝑤 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑡ℎ𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑡ℎ𝑠. 𝑌𝑜𝑢'𝑣𝑒 𝑏𝑒𝑒𝑛 𝑎𝑠𝑘𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑚𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑜𝑛 𝑦𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑠ℎ𝑜𝑤 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑡ℎ𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑡ℎ𝑠... 𝐼𝑡 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑔𝑜𝑡 𝑏𝑙𝑜𝑐𝑘𝑒𝑑, 𝑏𝑒𝑐𝑎𝑢𝑠𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑦 𝑑𝑖𝑑𝑛'𝑡 𝑙𝑖𝑘𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤𝑎𝑦 𝑦𝑜𝑢 ℎ𝑎𝑛𝑑𝑙𝑒𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠." 𝐻𝑒 𝑠𝑎𝑦𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠 𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑏𝑒𝑡𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑛𝑜𝑤.
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